51 Yorkshire Words And Phrases That Mean Nothing To Anyone Else

The Yorkshire accent is a wonderful thing and can be confusing to outsiders. You could spend years in a town and then when you move a few miles down the road you’ll find that these Yorkshire folk use a whole host of different phrases to where you’ve just been. There are some similarities between the west, south, north and east of God’s Own Country, but despite the differences the language is just as beautiful. WIth that in mind Yorkshire slang is a hard thing to define.

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The most strongest accent has to be in the South of Yorkshire, especially Barnsley, which has a whole host of words that other parts of Yorkshire don’t use. We asked our wonderful readers what words and phrases are most Yorkshire and aim to create the ultimate guide of Yorkshire words and phrases to make this the ultimate place to go for all things Yorkshire. If you’ve got any more that you think need to be in our list, let us know!

1. Laikin’/ Larkin

This usually means whether someone is playing out or not, or if they’re been silly. It has been known to be used if someone is off work as well. As always Yorkshire folk don’t like to use the G at the end of words.

“Is Big Lad laikin‘ out today?”

2. Bray

To hit someone or to grind something into small pieces.

“‘ere dickhead come ‘ere or I’ll bray yer.”

3. Mardy

Probably the most commonly known Yorkshire word thanks to the Arctic Monkeys tune. Normally means when someone is in a mood and acting irritable (usually the Mrs).

“Na then, Mardy Bum”

4. Be Reyt

A Yorkshire folks response to when things are going wrong. Our positive attitude or thank we couldn’t careless shines through with this phrase. Usuallt followed with a response of “pint?”

“Cars broken down, be reyt”

“Pint?”

“Aye”

5. Ey up

The Yorkshire greeting. When to Yorkshire folk meet this is one of many non-sensical ways we’ll greet each other. It can also mean ‘look at that’ or ‘watch out’.

“Ey up, ‘ow’s it goin'”

“Ey, up, ‘ere comes trouble.”

6. Chuffin’

‘Cos no one likes a potty mouth chuffin’ is a Yorkshire way of using the F-word without using it. A great way to express annoyance.

“Chuffin’ hell!.”

7. Cog / Croggy

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What you call it when someone gives you a lift on their bike. Sometimes also referred to by Yorkshire folk as a backie.

“Do us a cog, mate”

8. Butty

We aren’t going to get into the bread bun debate, but there is one thing for sure that a sandwich is called a butty in good ol’ Yorkshire. Especially in reference to a chip butty.

“Chip butty wi’ scraps, cheers.”

9. Lug ‘ole

Usually used by parents with reference to the ears.

“Keep on goin’ like that an’ you’ll get a clip roun’ t’ lug ‘ole”

10. Daft ‘apeth

A term of endearment in Yorkshire. Usually meaning silly person and said in a reassuring manner.

“Don’t worry about it yer daft ‘apeth”

11. Thanos
No not the Marvel bad guy. Pronoucned tha’nos, it usually means you know or for, and is used at the end of a setence.

“Be reyt, tha’nos.”

12. Put t’wood in t’oil

Yorkshire Slang
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Means shut the bloody door, it’s freezing.

“Put t’wood in t’oil yer bugger.”

13. Guwin t’ shop, wanowt

This means “would you like anything from the shop as I am going.” As Yorkshire people have short arms and deep pockets, the answer should always be no.

14. Snicket/Ginnel/Gennel

The term varies across Yorkshire but generally means alleyway or passageway. Typically between fences or walls in an open space or between gardens.

15. Brossend

Usually used after you’ve had one of yer nanas classic Sunday Roasts, Brossend means full to burst.

“Does thee want another Yorkshire?”

“Na, am brossend.”

16. Thee, tha, thou

Usually referring to one person, this is a Yorkshire term for you.

“Does tha fancy another pint?”

17. Nesh

Nesh means to feel the cold. Something Northern folk rarely do, but on that occassion we’d say that.

“Nesh bugger, it’s only 6 degrees.”

18. Maftin

Yorkshire Slang
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When the sun pokes its head out and every person in Yorkshire starts seating. Maftin usually refers to being well hot.

“It’s bloody maftin’ in here.”

19. Nithered

What everyone feels when they’re sat in a beer garden in April.

“Turn the heating on, I’m nithered.”

20. Anno

No this isn’t some biblical word, this is how Yorkshire folk say “I know”

“Anno, us Yorkshire folk can be tight.”

21. Radge

Generally used to describe someone that is crazy, or violent and angry.

“That fight last night were radged.”

22. Down Town

How a Yorkshire person says they’re going into the city centre

“Am off down town, want owt?”

23. Shagga

Get your head out of the gutter, it doesn’t mean that. In Yorkshire it’s a friendly term for someone who is your friend.

“Na then, Shagga!”

24. Coyt

How Yorkshire folk say coat.

“You won’t need yer coyt, it’s only -6 degrees.”

25. Buggerlugs

Another term of endearment, usually used to greet someone or get their attention. A great li’ bit of Yorkshire slang.

“Oi buggerlugs, put the kettle on.”

26. ‘Ow do

A Yorkshire greeting. Usually a reciprocal response of “‘ow do.”

“Nar then, ‘ow do”

27. Nowt/ Owt

Two similar sounds with opposite meanings. Nowt means nothing and owt means anything.

“Well, what is it? Owt ot nowt?

28. Eck/Eckers

Another attempt at avoiding bad language, this generally replaces hell or other swear words. One of our favourite Yorkshire Slang terms.

“Did he ‘eckers.”

29. Mooch

What Yorkshire folk say instead of walk or wander.

“Fancy a mooch into town?”

30. ‘Ow Much

The Yorkshire cry can be usually heard when something is expensive. It’s best to be shouted.

“‘Ow muuuuchhh.”

31. Morngy

Another great word to describe someone being an arsey bugger.

“What’s up your arse you morngy bastard.”

32. Manky

The best way to describe the word manky is the when you put your hand in a sink and remove all the soggy food. That’s manky.

“Eeerrgh, that’s manky.”

33. Gip

The act of being physically sick.

“When someone mentions puttin gthe milk in a brew first it makes me gip.”

34. C’unt

no we aren’t swearing at you. Us Yorkshire folk like to shorten our words which means couldn’t gets shorteneed to well c’unt.

“I c’unt get a seat in the boozer.”

35. Wang

No it’s not an innuendo. Wang means to throw or toss.

“Wang it ova there, bor.”

36. Sup wier

How Yorkshire mum’s as what’s up to their children when they’re tring to scive school.

“Tha’s nowt wrong wier ya. Sup wier?”

37. Eeh by Gum

The Yorkshire way of saying oh my gosh.

“Eeh by gum, it’s bloody freezing out.!

38. Arse End

means in the middle of nowhere.

“It’s in the arse end of the universe.”

39. Bagsy

To claim something for yourself.

“Turn around, touch the ground, bagsy not it.”

40. Twagging/Wagging

To bunk off school.

41. Chorers

Townies or chavs, a slang term for them.

42. Gander

To have a look for something.

“Let’s have a gander.”

43. Kegs

A term for your underwear.

“I haven’t got any clean kegs.”

44. Lamp

Tp punch someone.

“Keep going and I’ll lamp ya.”

45. Monk On

When the wife is being arsey.

“She’s got a reyt monk on.”

46. Mack Off

Origniating for East Yorkshire, it means if something is huge.

“That’s a mack off sarnie.”

47. Now Then/ Now Bor

How Yorkshire folk greet each other.

“Now then, daft lad.”

48. Reyt Good

How Yorkshire folk say really good. One of the most common used Yorkshire slang words in our house.

That’s reyt good tha’.”

49. Ta’ra 

See you later

“Ta’ra, love.”

50. Si’thi’ 

See you later.

“Ta’ra.”

“Si’thi.”

51. Tha Sen

How Yorkshire folk say Yourself.

“Keep tha hands t’ tha sen.”

Drop a note in the comments or get in touch with us if youwould like some more words adding to our Yorkshire slang list.

Read More: 22 Brilliant Yorkshire Sayings That Would Confuse Non-Yorkshire Folk

Author: The Yorkshireman

Founder and owner of The Yorkshireman - a regional publication that celebrates all things Yorkshire. Find me dawdling in the Dales or walking the dog on the Yorkshire coast.