Britain’s Longest, Highest And Deepest Canal Tunnel Is In Yorkshire

Britain’s Longest, Highest And Deepest Canal Tunnel Is In Yorkshire

West Yorkshire’s famous canal trip, Standedge Tunnels, is open to the public once more, as the Visitors Centre has decided to restart its boat trips. The series of four parallel tunnels through the Pennines is Britain’s longest, highest, deepest, and most unique experience for visitors.

Standedge Tunnels West Yorkshire
Credit: Standedge Tunnel and Visitor Centre

Marvel at the 19th-century engineering as you travel through these incredible 200-year-old relics. Found on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, you can enjoy a 30-minute trip on the waterway underneath the Pennines, which is listed as one of the Canal and River Trust’s Seven Wonders of the Waterways.

The tunnel took 16 years to build and was finished back in 1811. The tunnel is listed as one of the Canal and River Trust’s Seven Wonders of the Waterways. It is nearly three-and-a-half miles long, 645 feet above sea level, and goes 638 feet underground. The last commercial trip through the tunnels was 100 years ago in 1921.

Standedge Tunnels West Yorkshire
Credit: Standedge Tunnel and Visitor Centre

You can visit the museum gallery and the Watersedge Cafe on your travels after enjoying a boat ride through the tunnels or take a canoe trip which is being offered for the first time.

Vicky Levine, area operations manager for the Canal and River Trust which runs the attraction, said: “We’re delighted to be able to run boats into the tunnel again. Although we’ve had a lot of visitors to the site over recent months, it’s great people can experience in the tunnel itself once more.”

Credit: Standedge Tunnel and Visitor Centre

She added: “We want to ensure our guests have an enjoyable and safe experience at this historic attraction, so please follow all of the Covid safe precautions we have put in place.”

Visitors are asked to wear face masks in the tunnels and children under the age of six may not ride. It is a maximum of 10 people per boat ride.

The tunnels have a link to the paranormal. Both staff and visitors have reported strange lights, unexplained sounds and even robed figures lurking in the depths of the tunnel. Official figures claim that 50 people died in the making of the tunnel that took 2,500 navvies to dig from Marsden, West Yorkshire to Diggle in Greater Manchester, according to The Mirror.

To find out more, or to book visit their Facebook page here.

Read More: 8 Breathtaking Natural Wonders You Have To Visit In Yorkshire

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